Tag Archives: diy

Scrap Wood Table

16 Jul

sun room table, diy coffee table

The sun room is coming along nicely, if I do say so myself!  The addition of our DIY coffee table really helped to finish things off.  When we decided to add a coffee table, we hit Pinterest (follow me for more sun room eye-candy!) to find some inspiration:

sun room table inspiration

1. Vintage Chic 2. No Link-through 3. No Link=through 4. Jenna Sue Design 5. No Link-through

We already had a crate-like thing going on, round wasn’t functional, and since Eric was building it, he got the final choice (5).  Though I have to admit, I’m totally digging 4.  The inspiration picture  used 2×4’s for the top, but we wanted something a bit wider, so we changed the plan.

We measured and made a plan for what we wanted to fit our exact space–my favorite thing to do when measuring for furniture or art is to put painters tape down in the dimensions you’re thinking to really help visualize.  We had to take into account what size lumber could fit into the car, and what would be most cost effective, for example, buying longer boards that can be cut down instead of multiple boards of the exact dimensions–a little more time, but usually cheaper.  We hit Menards (always a treat with a toddler in tow!) and went straight to the “value wood” pile.  Basically, this is a pile of scrap wood that may be a bit warped, have large knots, or leftover pieces from cuts made in the store–if you can work with this, you’re getting a little deal.

Were were able to find everything we needed with the exception of the 4×4:

  • (5) 4ft. 2×6’s
  • (2) 6ft. 2×4’s
  • (1) 6ft. 4×4

The total cost was around $35.

The dimensions of the table are 5 ft l x 2 ft. w, and 18″ h.

I asked the hubby to give some tips on how he put it together…

“A billion pocket holes, a measuring tape, and a trusty #2 pencil.”  Sorry folks, you’re on your own from here! 🙂 I will say he’s becoming quite addicted to the Kreg Jig, though.

I do know he assembled the top and bottom separately, as I stained them separately.  We used the same Rustoleum Kona stain we had on hand, using an apply-then-wipe strategy, then followed with 2 coats of polyurethane.  After that, we decided to jazz it up by adding some hardware on the ends.

sun room table, sunroom, diy coffee table

I bought some basic 1″ L brackets (or corner braces) at Lowe’s for about $2 each. Each bracket had a price sticker on it, so I used my lazy Go0-Gone method to get it off: spray a few squirts on a plate, put the object with goo on the plate to soak, come back later to easily wipe it off. (Don’t forget to wash it with soap and water.)

goo gone

Then I picked up this spray paint:

I must say, I’ve been doing a lot of spray painting lately, and I swear by Rustoleum.  Valspar seems to have a lot more colors, but it doesn’t go on as easily or hold up as well as Rustoleum. To paint the screws, I grabbed a leftover styrofoam take-out container and punched the screws through. Voila!

paint screws, spray paint screws

To keep the finish on the screws, Eric pre-drilled the holes into the table, then hand-screwed them in.

Then it was on to accessorizing! Most things we already had on hand. We love these Pottery Barn flameless candles since burning any type of candle can release carcinogens into the air.

pottery barn flameless candles

This serving tray was complements of a wedding gift 5 years ago, and I just Modge Podged it with some scrapbook paper.

I picked these succulents up at Lowe’s for just a couple dollars, and plopped into these metal buckets from the Target Dollar Spot that I bought to store Matty’s craft supplies.

sun room decor

P.S. I feel like a legitimate blogger now–I have a photo styled with Pellegrino bottles.  Seriously–find me a home decor blog that doesn’t use Pellegrino bottles in staging! 🙂

sun room, table, diy

sun room, table

A Tisket A Tasket…

9 Jul

DIY Rustic Crate Baskets

…a rustic crate-like basket. Oh yeah, I busted that rhyme.

I was in search of a couple of baskets for a new cabinet we built for our recent sunroom makeover.  Problem is, the cabinet is custom built, so I was having a difficult time finding basket that fit the dimensions.  I knew I’d have to DIY something.  Not a problem, I thought–we’ve got tons of scrap wood and materials taking up floor space in the garage.  In fact, we had a bundle of furring strips that I knew would be perfect.  But problem.  I’m not skilled enough to actually build the frame (or at least a structurally-sound frame). As I was perusing Wal-Mart later that week, I saw these:

These little baskets, while neither rustic (or that appealing) or quite the right size, where in fact perfect…nothing a little hot glue couldn’t fix! So at $1.89 each, I was sold.

The baskets had connectors on all sides, so that the baskets could lock together.  I squirted some glue in the holes, essentially gluing two baskets together.  The connectors stuck out just a tad further than the rest of the basket, which means my furring strips wouldn’t fit snugly in some parts.  So first, I created a base layer of furring strips on each side.

DIY Rustic Basket

DIY Rustic Basket

Then, I glued the outer layer of furring strips to that base.

DIY Rustic Basket

The blue baskets were still visible at this point, so I used furring strips to cover the top ledge.  Then it was time for stain–I love Kona by Rust-Oleum.  It’s the perfect espresso color–a rich brown with no red undertones.

I knew I wanted to add some sort of “pop” on the front, and after scouring Pinterest for hours, decided a black stencil of some sort would be best.  However, I didn’t have a stencil or black paint.  I did have stamps and craft ink, though!

I wasn’t entirely sure if this would work, but decided why not?  It didn’t go on completely smooth, which was actually great because it looks worn without have to sand or mar it in any way.

DIY Rustic Baskets

There’s no significance to the numbers, though Hubby doesn’t believe me.  He thinks it’s the phone number for my hot Latin lover or the combination to some top-secret safe with dead bodies or loads of money.  He clearly thinks highly of me.

They turned out perfect, and will work great in our sun room for outdoor candles, bug repellent, and other outdoor odds and ends.

Buckle It Up: Toddler Buckle Toy

23 Apr

Oh yes. We’re in the that phase.  The “me do” stage.  The “I can buckle my carseat by myself, MOM!” stage.  Since this is a skill he obviously wants to practice, I went on the hunt for some sort of buckle toy.  The best I could come up with was this:

Buster Buckle Toy

Don’t get me wrong, this is cute and pretty close to perfect, but at $25 + $5 shipping, it might be one of the most expensive toys we own (seriously).  I thought I could probably make my own for much, much cheaper. And I did!

diy toddler buckle toy

My sewing skills are very subpar.  But this was relatively easy and quick.  I used the basic “pillow sham” theory–sewing two pieces of fabric together inside out, then turning it right side out, stuffing it with some batting, and sewing the top.  However, before sewing the sides, you’ll want to pin your ribbons for the buckles.

The longest part of the ribbon (the part the buckle will be attached to) gets pinned to the inside, so when it gets turned right side out they’re on the right side.  Make sense? OMG, it took me a good 5 minutes staring at it to get this right.  It probably didn’t help that my ribbons were patterned, so I had to get the right side of the ribbon right side up. ::sigh::  I need a sewing class.

Attaching the buckles were easy, even if my sewing lines were not so hot…I used a combination of 1″ buckles and 1/2″ buckles.  I wanted to use colorful buckles, but I couldn’t find any bigger than this.  This actually was a happy surprise, because Wee One loves those the most–huzzah for super-fine motor skill development!

Drumroll, please…total price: $3.50

Granted, I already had the fabric, batting, thread, and ribbon. I estimate a yard of fabric, a couple spools of ribbon, and some batting (or use an old throw pillow?) shouldn’t run more than $7-$8 dollars if you use $.99 fabric quarters from Jo Anns (or Walmart).

I also had to buy the buckles in bulk, so the upfront cost was a bit more, but I actually made a few extras that I plan on trying to sell at our upcoming community garage sale.

And of course, it’s a hit.  My original plan was to keep it in the car to keep Wee One occupied during numerous drives back and forth to Lowes (hello, landscaping weather!), but as you can see, it has made its way into the house.

As he masters the buckles, I have plans to add a few more doo-dads–clips, carbiners, and rings–for even more fun!

Questions:

  • Ever see a toy and think, “I could make that!”.
  • Anybody have a love-hate relationship with the sewing machine like I do? Grrrr…

Pinterest Challenge Winter Edition

26 Feb

Whoo whoo. It’s that time again.  Time to stop pinning and start doing!

This couldn’t have come at a better time, since I was just getting ready to start a project.  (It couldn’t have come at a worse time either because the wee one is sick, sick, sick.)

Wee One needs a place to nap on Wednesdays when he goes to the babysitter’s house.  The first week he apparently slept in the pack-n-play like a champ (I didn’t have high hopes of that lasting long). And it didn’t.  Last week he apparently took a blanket and pillow and curled up in the corner. Poor kid. Haha.  So I decided to make him a napmat to take along.

napmat

(Hubby took these pics for me…don’t you love the staged blanket?  He’s a keeper I tell ya!)

I found “pinspiration” here, here, here, and here.

napmat2

I really like the first one, since we actually had a king size comforter without a use, so I just made a quick trip to Jo Ann Fabrics. #horriblefabricselection

All that’s needed for this project is fabric, thread, and some sort of filler–unused comforter or blankets or even regular cotton fill.  I thought about doing it no-sew, but I was afraid of how it would hold up to washing.  I think it would work out, though.

As for the fabric, I bought 2.5 yards off a standard bolt, then just folded it in half.  Exact measuring there, I know.  Ironically enough, that seems to be the perfect fit for a king comforter folded into fourths if you fold the edges of the comforter over a bit.  This is nice because it adds a bit of a roll barrier to the edge, making it nice and cozy.

I also hoped to add a pillow, but the hubs broke the needle on my sewing machine.  How, you ask? Because he had to take over the project halfway through while I nursed a sick toddler on the couch for three days (and counting).  And both of us are too lazy/busy/tired to figure out how to fix it.

(He’s now the beauty AND the brains of this relationship…)

I made three changes from the original tutorial:

1. Add a button closure to the top for easy washing instead of stitching it closed.  Took quite a bit longer, but still a naptime project (if you have a kid that naps well), or a 2 nap project if you have a kid like mine. 🙂

2. Don’t cut the comforter into 4 parts, just fold it.  Then it’s still washable.

3. Only 1 set of straps to tie it together.  Definitely still sturdy and manageable.

We’ll see how it goes today, but he’s been enjoying it for a couple of days now. Well, as much as one can enjoy something while sick. 😦

The blanket was a perfect snuggle partner in the “sicky chair”.

Looking for more pinspiration?  Check out the other Challenge projects link-ups:

Megan @ The Remodeled Life

Katie @ Bower Power

Sherry @ Young House Love

Michelle @ Decor and the Dog

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